Welcome House In The News

Follow the links below to local media articles to learn more about Welcome House and what we’re doing in NKY!

“We’re seeing a lot more people that are looking for services. A lot of people outside are scared. They don’t really understand what’s going on. Could you imagine waking up one day and then you walk outside on the streets of Covington and there’s nobody?”

One of the keys to preventing the spread of COVID-19 among the homeless and between the homeless and others is something most of us take for granted: the ability to wash your hands. Hand cleanliness – a challenge under the best of circumstances for the homeless – is nearly impossible now, with libraries, some shelters and other places now closed.

 

Amrine said the use of a hotel is ideal for both protecting the homeless population and following the state’s quarantine guidelines. Each guest will have his or her own room, ensuring the requisite social distancing. Guests can shower and otherwise attend to their hygiene needs. The Welcome House nurse will conduct physical exams and consultation.

Dozens of Greater Cincinnati homeless are on lockdown at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center where they can eat, sleep and receive medical care.

The convention center agreed to the arrangement for two weeks after the Welcome House of Northern Kentucky and the Emergency Shelter of Northern Kentucky asked Kenton County Judge Executive Kris Knochelmann for a solution in the midst of the coronavirus outbreak.

“We have three decades of experience with payee programs and a record of positive outcomes,” said Welcome House CEO Danielle Amrine. “It is much more efficient for us to bring this expertise and infrastructure to Lexington than for an organization to try and replicate it from scratch. That’s what made Welcome House attractive to the city, and that’s the model we’re using across the state.”

“Our recognition by such a respected organization says a lot about the professionals, funders and volunteers of Welcome House,” said Welcome House CEO Danielle Amrine. “It is nothing short of inspiring. The bottom line is that this grant will help end homelessness for more people in our community.”

This one-time grant, awarded to organizations moving the needle on family homelessness, will allow Welcome House Northern Kentucky to enhance current programming.

“Our ultimate mission is to get people off of the streets and get people out of homelessness, but unfortunately there’s just nowhere for people to go right now. There’s not shelter space for folks,” said director of program operations Justin Beal.

This is the 28th year for the fundraiser that benefits Bethany House Services of Cincinnati, Brighton Center’s Homeward Bound and Welcome House of Northern Kentucky. Together these agencies serve more than 40,000 needy individuals in our community each year.

Young and her organization will celebrate Tuesday another milestone as it unveils eight rehabilitated properties in Covington’s historic Mainstrasse Village district. The project, which began in 2014 and concluded this year, brings 41 new, affordable housing units to the neighborhood.

The $9.5 million project was financed by a mixture of low-income tax credits, federal and state historic tax credits, and a little more than $500,000 pitched in by Welcome House.

“It’s a marathon, not a sprint,” Amrine said. “What will need to happen is we sustain this funding and donations beyond when the economy opens back up because that’s when we’re really going to feel the effects of COVID-19.”

Amrine believes Welcome House can handle the turmoil. But many nonprofits will not.

 

Amrine said the organization is paying for the 30-day quarantine issued by the state of Kentucky.

“We’re paying around, a little over $12,400 for blocks of rooms per week, so we’re probably thinking it’s going to cost upwards of $50,000 to $60,000 for a month to house these individuals,” Amrine said.

“It’s definitely on our radar. When we have people going out and doing street outreach they are providing hand sanitizer, educating clients on how to cough, how to wash hands and make sure that they’re not touching their face or eyes,” said Amrine.

Kelly Rose, Director of Marketing and Development, and Sara Kahmann, Marketing and Development Manager, join the Northern Kentucky Chamber’s NKY Spotlight podcast to talk about the upcoming Mardi Gras for Homeless Children event and the recently announced $1.25 million Bezos Day One Fund grant which will increase Welcome House’s services for homeless families.

A specially-equipped RV has officially hit the streets of Northern Kentucky to provide medical care for people experiencing homelessness in different counties.

“We’re going to be in parks, libraries, soup kitchens – anywhere where homeless people are we’re going to be there providing them with services they deserve and need,” said Justin Veale, director of program operations.

Welcome House is the lead agency in the Northern Kentucky for conducting this year’s K-Count for the unsheltered homeless population.

“We are hoping to shed light on the homeless issues our region faces daily.” said Justin Beale, director of programs and services at Welcome House of Northern Kentucky.

Justin Beale, director of program operations for Welcome House of NKY, says you can’t solve the increasing homelessness problem in Northern Kentucky without building more affordable housing.

“Without housing, we won’t be able to help people,” Beale said. “It’s great to be able to provide blankets, and provide food. Those aren’t really solving the big issue that’s happening in the community.”

Some families still are staying at Welcome House of Northern Kentucky’s Covington shelter after staff members determined it was possible to maintain appropriate social distancing at the facility, said Welcome House CEO Danielle Amrine.

But Welcome House has spent nearly $30,000 on hotel rooms for other families since March 1, when the organization started booking rooms for families because its shelter was full, she said.

Social service agencies have set up an emergency homeless shelter inside the Northern Kentucky Convention Center in Covington to help flatten the curve and reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus, said Welcome House of Northern Kentucky’s CEO.

“Our recognition by such a respected organization says a lot about the professionals, funders and volunteers of Welcome House,” said Welcome House CEO Danielle Amrine. “It is nothing short of inspiring. The bottom line is that this grant will help end homelessness for more people in our community.”

This one-time grant, awarded to organizations moving the needle on family homelessness, will allow Welcome House Northern Kentucky to enhance current programming.

“The K-Count is important for this region because it puts an actual number to the amount of homeless people we are meeting on a day to day basis on the streets,” says Justin Beale, Director of Programs and Services at Welcome House of Northern Kentucky. “We are hoping to shed light on the homeless issues our region faces daily.”

“We worked collaboratively to assist John,” said Justin Beale, lead case manager for the Welcome House, which started helping Kemmerling several months ago.

“I first saw John probably back in December. When he first came in, we assisted him with employment. I’ve seen a change in him in these months in how hard he’s been working to stabilize himself.”

Danielle Amrine has a passion for nonprofit work and making the world a better place…Currently, she is the CEO of The Welcome House of Northern Kentucky where she focuses on providing a continuum of services that end homelessness in the Northern Kentucky region.

This is the second year students organized the Warm the Homeless drive. They served chili and provided warm clothing and hygiene products to more than 60 people experiencing homelessness at the Welcome House. Snacks and warm clothes were also delivered to 30 people at the Emergency Cold Shelter in Covington.

The United States Department of Veterans Affairs offers help to many veterans struggling with homelessness, but not veterans like Harris. He was dishonorably discharged, disqualifying him from receiving VA assistance.